7 Insanely High in Sugar Fruits All Slimming Girls Should Avoid πŸ‡πŸ’πŸŒ ...

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We know it’s really important to eat fruit.

It’s also the healthiest way to satisfy a sweet tooth.

But not all fruit is created equal.

All fruit contains fructose – fruit sugar.2

Although natural, it is still a sugar, and with sugar comes calories.

If you’re watching your weight, or are concerned about your sugar intake, you should know which fruits you are best avoiding or eating in moderation.

1. Figs

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Topping the list of fruits with the highest amount of sugar is figs.2

Although they are a mega source of potassium (149mg in 65g), and a good source of vitamins B6 and K, the average fig (65g) contains 10.4g of sugar.

They are very filling though and a single fig sliced up with some Greek yogurt and a drizzle of honey makes an excellent breakfast.

2. Grapes

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Closely following figs, are grapes.

This might seem surprising but when you think about it, the main product of grapes is wine and that’s because all that sugar turns into alcohol.2

In a serving of 10 grapes (49g), there is 7.6g of sugar.

3. Mangoes

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One of the most delicious fruits!

Mango is so juicy and sweet when it’s ripe.

It’s fabulous in smoothies and desserts and even drinks and it’s so refreshing on a hot day.

The great thing about mangoes is that as well as being absolutely packed with vitamin A, they are satisfying, which is a good thing because 1 cup (165g) of fresh fruit contains 24g of sugar.

4. Pomegranates

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Those ruby jewels are so pretty and the burst of juice and flavor you get when you bite down on one is joyful, in sweet and savory dishes.

Maybe it’s a good thing that it’s some serious hassle to get those arils (fancy name for the fruit bit) out because Β½ cup (87g) comes with 12g sugar.

But you’re getting a nice hit of vitamins K and C and Folate too.

Cherries
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